Prostrate Knotweed, Puncturevine, Russian Thistle, Tumble Pigweed Control

As the Valley’s leading pest control company for decades we have helped thousands of families and businesses remove unwanted pests from their home or business location, including weeds. Contact us today for your FREE ESTIMATE!

Weed Control Information

 

 

Prostrate Knotweed

Producing many seeds, the prostrate knotweed is most commonly found on the dry soil of walkways, yards, and waste ground in Arizona. It is an annual weed that grows wherever the soil is dry and compacted. The prostrate knotweed contains small white flowers that are sometimes hidden within the knotweed. It begins flowering mainly March through October.

Puncturevine

Puncturevine is one of the most abundant and obnoxious weeds in southern Arizona. It is a bother to cotton, alfalfa, pastures, roadsides, yards, citrus orchards, and walkways.  After summer rains, puncturevine appears in numbers. It begins flowering in March to October, then spurts in July and August. The weed produces an amazing number of burs that scatter on the ground once they dry out and mature. The burs on the puncturevine can easily pierce through shoes, bike tires, and bare feet.

Russian Thistle

The Russian thistle was brought into the United States in flax seed in the late 1800’s, and it has become one of the most common and obnoxious weeds found in the state of Arizona and other dry regions of the United States. One Russian thistle may hold thousands of seeds that may live for years and scatter as the weed tumbles in the wind. In the northeastern part of Arizona, Russian thistle is found in overgrazed grasslands, disturbed wastelands, and even in some cropland. Russian thistle begins flowering in May through November and as the plant matures, it dries and turns prickly and sticky to the touch. Once died, the plant is broken off at ground level and seeds are dispersed as the weed is carried away in the wind.

Tumble Pigweed

Scattered throughout Arizona, pigweed is one of the most common weed pest found in flax, cotton, and other cultivated fields. It is also commonly found along roadsides, river bottoms, rocky sloped, open fields, waste places….pretty much anywhere the wind carries its seeds. Tumble pigweed begins flowering in May through November and as the plant matures, it dries and turns prickly and sticky to the touch. Once died, the plant is broken off at ground level and seeds are dispersed as the weed is carried away in the wind.